In the world of technology, when one woman helps another, amazing things can happen

In Africa’s male-dominated technology (tech) scene, women remain largely underrepresented. Yet there is a growing sense that a handful of incredible women are setting new standards and encouraging others especially younger women to become “techy”. Many believe that when one woman helps another, amazing things can happen-professional careers leap forward.


Yes indeed, amazing things do happen. I recently attended one of these gatherings where established women professionals in technology were mentoring young women aspiring to take their STEM careers a step further.

I feel lucky. My generation is seeing a paradigm shift both in women’s reception to Science and technology information- a field which traditionally was considered male dominated – and the support that women are giving each other these days. It’s a remarkable turnaround! I kid you not. It’s been a long journey.

This mentoring session was organized by Women in Tech Africa. An organisation borne out of the perseverance and persistence of likeminded women on the continent, spearheaded by Ethel Cofie.

In her own words, Ethel says:

“Working in technology can, at times, be an isolating experience for women, especially in Africa. The impact of this can limit women’s professional growth in the sector. Women need mentors, role-models and a network to share their experiences, challenges and skills. Some Women in Technology clubs exist already, but to date, no-one has attempted to build a pan-African network, allowing us to compare our challenges, learn from other countries and connect across borders to expand our influence.”

Apart from founding WITA, Africa’s largest women in tech group with members in over 30 Africa countries and physical chapter in Ghana ,Kenya  and London, Ms. Cofie is also CEO and Founder of EDEL Technology Consulting (An IT Consulting and Digital Products Company in West Africa and Europe). She know too well hoow difficult it can be for anyone aspiring to set up their own IT start ups:

 “Starting my own business was a struggle; a lot of ups and downs to the extent that I had to shut down, get corporate jobs and restart from zero. This is because I had at that time not much knowledge or anyone to advise me on how to nurture and grow a startup, customer acquisition and retention among other. I decided to start a school to help other women on insight into beginning a startup.”



written by: Adisa Amanor Wilks – communications professional passionate about Africa.

And Gloria Dogbey – Innovation Analyst with EDEL Technology Consulting and Coordinator of Women in Tech Africa










Also at the event was Angela Mazza the Chief Operating Officer (COO) for .  She told us about her journey as a woman navigating the world of technology, and what it means to her to be in her position in one of the biggest software development companies in the world.

Read more about Angela>>






















StartUp Cup Africa Launches



The U.S. Embassy Accra have commended the maiden Africa StartUp Cup Summit and anticipate it will showcase and celebrate entrepreneurs from every conceivable industry, in a very extra ordinary way and in the process shine a global light on the power of Africa entrepreneurs and start-ups to improve lives.


ASC Summit  participants will be taken through a series of practical workshops. ASC Summit offers participants the opportunity to interact with the owners of million-dollar businesses from Africa and global start-up ecosystems and provides  them with free one-on-one mentorship with these entrepreneurs.


Ghana will host the maiden edition of ASC Summit on 29th April, 2016 under the theme Growing entrepreneurs and jobs in Africa’s start-up ecosystem”


We have made ASC Summit hands on and practical for each African youth to gain lessons and benefit from one-on-one mentorship as well as panel sessions. Our speakers speak from deep experience in business. Some include: Sean Griffin, CEO & Founder of StartUp Cup World (Washington DC) , Diana Ofwona, West & Central  Africa Regional Director of UN Women, Neal Hansch, Managing Director of MEST (Ghana) , Albert Biga, CEO of Zooba Shop (Ghana) , Neeraj Gala, Product & Innovations Director of Bharti Airtel Africa (Kenya Head Quarters) , Ethel Cofie, Founder & CEO  of Women in Tech Africa (Ghana) , Eric Kinoti, CEO of Shade Systems EA (Kenya and Eastern Africa), Lukonga Lindunda, CEO of BongoHive (Zambia), Vuyisa Qabaka, CEO of Entrepreneur Traction (South Africa), Zineb Rharrasse, Founder of StartUp Maroc (Morocco), Ahmed Maawy, Founder of Swahilibox(Kenya).


Notes for Participants


Venue for ASC Summit: Alisa Hotel, North Ridge, Accra.

Date: 29th April, 2016

Time: 9am to 3pm (6 hours of intensive hands on training and experience based mentorship)




For more information, please contact Douglas Ogeto at or log on to

You could be jailed for posting that cute baby pic!


By Keitu Reid

no babies


Often I have been thought of as a prude when I didn’t post pictures of my son online. For me, the reason is basic… if the internet is accessible to everyone, anywhere – how can I post a picture of my son not knowing who will access his images. Suffering from both skepticism and paranoia – I opted to keep family pictures, my hang-outs and holiday destinations offline. I agree that you can have closed groups – except when someone shares your image – it is not so closed anymore. Privacy settings are great – but I am guessing if hackers can get into NASA – they can bypass a privacy setting or two?


The decision not to post any of my son’s pictures on social media – or to comment about his latest award, medal, first kiss and the like was about showing him my respect and recognising that he is his own person. It’s about allowing him to grow up without having a thousand of my Facebook friends ‘knowing’ him – while he knows nothing about them.


It’s about guiding and guarding his life for as long as possible until he learns from me what responsible social networking is – both on and offline.

I do not post pictures of my son online because I appreciate and understand that being his mother doesn’t give me the right to take away his basic and critical human right… the right to privacy.


And so when the French announced that parents could be jailed for posting their children’s images online – I thought ‘Good!’ It is sad that we have to police what we share with friends and family – but the internet is not like going through a photo album in the privacy of your lounge over tea and scones. The internet has identity thieves, pornographers, child molesters, bullies, and many other sorts lurking. This goes beyond privacy and straight into safety. We are women raising children where technological savvy is expected. We have to protect them.


Protecting our children is not limited to what we post about them – but also what we post about ourselves. Allow me to illustrate….a minister in South Africa recently had a picture of his penis doing the rounds on twitter. The minister said it was not his penis but some sort of smear campaign. He threatened to sue. I do not know if he did or not, nor do I care too much. Personally, I believe him. I do not think that it was his penis exposed on that photo.


However, I do think that his online demeanor, engagements and comments are sometimes questionable and will therefore invite such problems. I recall this very minister sharing a picture of his daughter on social media some time back. So, that day, when this particular penis was doing the twitter rounds …. What resurfaced in my mind was that photo of that little girl – only this time she wasn’t smiling – this time I imagined a sobbing, shattered, embarrassed little girl humiliated that her father’s ‘thing’ is the talk of Sunday Twitter. That is not cool.


We often forget that our children have access to these social media platforms and from time to time may peak into our networks. Yes, they are just as curious about what we do online, as we are curious about their online activities. The internet has created a bizarre situation where your 13-year-old consumes the same content you do – very simply and easily – and often uncensored.


I am a realist and I realise there is little I can do about that. What I can do is manage my online reputation – in this way perhaps I can prevent my son from wanting to disinherit his family name… and disown his mother.


Teen years are tough remember. Kids are moody, volatile and super-sensitive as they navigate the world and come to grips with tricky bodily changes. As a parent – it is unfair to have to expect your child to do this – and protect your honor in the online ‘playground’. Again…. Not cool.